Why George Orwell wrote “Animal Farm” – guest blog

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The Animal Farm by George Orwell is regarded as one of the greatest books of all time. It is a classic piece of satire that has never gone out of print since August 17th, 1945 when it was first published. The Guardian, a leading British newspaper, narrates an interesting account, initially when George Orwell sent the manuscript of his masterpiece, the Animal Farm, to poet TS Eliot for consideration, who at the time was the director of Faber and Faber Limited a leading publishing house, he rejected the manuscript and described it as an unconvincing piece of writing.

Animal Farm became one of Orwell’s most read and timeless piece of work. You can get your copy of this literary classic exclusively at Kaymu, a leading online marketplace. This novel is an allegorical piece of writing that utilizes an animal fable to describe the rise and fall of socialist regimes in the former Soviet Union.  It is a story of barnyard animals who revolt against their masters in order to build a utopian state.

As a reader, we are always interested in knowing what motivated the great authors to pen down classic pieces of literature that entice our imagination. There have been a lot of speculation on why George Orwell penned down Animal Farm.

  • To simplify complex historical events and human behaviors

The number one reason why Orwell penned down the Animal Farm was to simplify the complex human behaviors. The author felt that when you write about reality, it has a tendency to become extremely complicated. However, once you narrate a story of barnyard animals, it becomes easier for the common reader to maintain a distance from the story and make sense of the actions of animals. As the reader goes deeper into the depth of the story, he realizes that behavior of animals is similar to that of humans. This animal fable points towards Russian Revolution and elucidates that how changes that seem positive at first have a tendency to become destructive.

  • To highlight the dissatisfaction that the average Russian felt due to the Communist Revolution

 

 

Orwell wrote the book before the Second World War It was his response to the Russian Revolution, the revolutionaries overthrew a regime and took over the control. The novel perfectly captures the irony of the movement. The communist regime that aimed to create a society where everyone would be equal devolved into a regime where some people were more equal than others. As the author eloquently writes it in the 10th chapter of the book, “All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others.”

Animal Farm is truly a masterwork and is regarded as the most popular 20th century political allegory. If you are an ardent reader, then this book should definitely be on your reading list.

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About psychedelicmindtrip

interested in writing, though lacking the motivation to actually do anything about it. old school rock'n'roll makes me happy, as does anarchy, revolution and questioning the status quo. war, women and youth empowerment, freedom of expression, conspiracy theories, art, literature, theater etc. i get bored with things easily but when something grabs my attention i'm very, very passionate. i like all kinds of exotic foods and am willing to try anything once. follow me on twitter @sgtpepperfloyd i will be using this blog mostly to vent, and as of now i'm converting it into a review blog. i will be reviewing anything and everything; music, books, movies, food, youtube videos, places, makeup, perfume, clothes, shoes... basically anything i have liked, loved, mildly enjoyed or greatly despised. i won't review video games though, because i don't propagate violence and outside of an apocalypse requiring you to fight for survival, i see no redeeming value in them and see playing video games as a waste of time.

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